Tour 300 Years of Historical Elegance at The Stagecoach Inn

The Stagecoach Inn in Goshen holds nearly 300 years of history and tradition. Here, we take you on a tour so you can see how its keepers welcome guests with elegance.



By Andrea Barbalich ✣ Photos by Ellen McDermott

When you walk through the front door of the Stagecoach Inn in Goshen, New York, it’s easy to imagine justices from the local courthouse arriving — some still wearing their robes — to have dinner nearly three centuries ago. The inn, built in 1747 and sitting on three acres, underwent an extensive renovation prior to reopening in September 2016, but it retains the beauty, charm, and tranquility of a bygone era.

Only a few families have owned the property through the years. Previous proprietors included wealthy landowner Anthony Dobbin, who bought the original farm in 1797 and turned it into a thriving inn; and William Hickok, a descendant of “Wild Bill” Hickok, and his wife, Margo George Hickok, who ran the inn until her death in 2011. The current owners, married couple Faith Ferguson and Ron Boire, bought the property in 2014 and spent more than a year on the renovation, determined to respect the original architecture and restore the inn to its full glory.

Their property now includes five guest rooms, each named for a former owner or famous guest and exhibiting its own color scheme and personality; two dining rooms; a living room; a bar; a covered porch; a tented event space; and lush outdoor gardens. Westchester Home spoke to Ferguson and Jennifer Vreeland, the interior designer she worked with, about the “traditional elegance” they were aiming for with the renovation.

 

The Powder Room


The striking first-floor bathroom features a navy vinyl wallpaper with a damask pattern chosen for its timelessness and beauty as well as for its sturdiness. The ceiling is papered in a contrasting metallic silver. An antique Venetian mirror hangs above the sink. The special touch: fresh flowers in a silver mint julep cup.

 

The Guest-Room Bathrooms

Each of the five guest bathrooms is painted a color that coordinates with the corresponding bedroom, but other elements are consistent for all: white subway tile on the walls, a mosaic pattern on the floors, white marble vanities, and similar mirrors and amenities.

 

The Guest Rooms

The color scheme for each bedroom began with something Ferguson or Vreeland fell in love with — often a fabric. One room is decorated in purple and gray; another features gray and yellow; the others are blue and white, blue and green, or orange and green.

“Each is a nice mix of new and old,” Vreeland says. “We acquired a lot of antique furniture and had it all reupholstered.” All the rooms have a similar custom-upholstered headboard, color-coordinated ceramic lamps on the nightstands, luxurious linens and throws, artwork acquired and reframed, and a sitting room to invite relaxation.

“Each room is very simple and perfectly appointed, so it feels comfortable and not cluttered,” Vreeland says. “We wanted the rooms to feel happy.”

 

The Dining Room:

The dining room is called the “Spode” room for the collection of Spode china pieces Vreeland curated from antique stores, eBay, and Etsy.

 

The Foyer

A beautiful space greets visitors as they step inside the inn. “We wanted it to make a statement and be welcoming,” Vreeland says. A circular table displays fresh flowers and books.

 

Ten special touches to make guests feel comfortable in your home.
 

• Fresh flowers on a nightstand

• Amenity basket (travel bottles of shampoo, conditioner, body wash, and lotion; toothbrush, toothpaste, and mouthwash; lint brush; cotton squares and swabs; and other small courtesies)

• Luxurious bath towel, hand towel, and washcloth for each person

• Scented candle

• Hair dryer 

• Luggage rack

• Bottled water with a pretty tumbler

• White terry robe

• Reading material (including books and magazines about the area)

• Charging station for phone and other devices

 

 

 

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