An Inside Look at Yayoi Kusama’s Mindblowing Infinity Mirror Room

Due to her popular infinity rooms, the 90-year-old Japanese artist has received a recent bump in attention.


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Yayoi Kusama, Where the Lights in My Heart Go, 2016, Stainless steel, aluminium, 300 x 300 x 300 cm, 118 1/8 x 118 1/8 x 118 1/8 in, From the collection of Lauren and Derek Goodman, Courtesy Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore/Shanghai and Victoria Miro, London/Venice, © YAYOI KUSAMA

In a coup for Connecticut’s 50-year-old MoCa Westport, on display this month are two installations by one of the world’s most popular living artists.

The museum will welcome Yayoi Kusama’s enigmatic work Infinity Mirror Room: Where the Lights in My Heart Go, a polished steel box that features a highly reflective exterior and an incredibly lit interior formed by thousands of minute holes. The second piece, Narcissus Garden, features a multitude of reflective spheres arranged in a dynamic field.


Yayoi Kusama, Where the Lights in My Heart Go, 2016, Stainless steel, aluminium, 300 x 300 x 300 cm, 118 1/8 x 118 1/8 x 118 1/8 in, From the collection of Lauren and Derek Goodman, Courtesy Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore/Shanghai and Victoria Miro, London/Venice, © YAYOI KUSAMA

 

Due to her popular infinity rooms, the 90-year-old Japanese artist, writer, and designer has received a recent bump in attention, with an entire museum dedicated to her in Tokyo.

Kusama — who has work on show in world-class museums stretching across China, the U.S., Russia, South Korea, France, Spain, and many other countries — is also recipient of the Order of Culture, arguably Japan’s highest artistic honor. Beginning on September 22, local art lovers will have the opportunity to experience two of Kusama’s masterful and immersive installations right in their own backyard.

 

 

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