These Ardsley Twins Created a CPR-Training App That Can Help Save Lives

The app focuses on CPR compression rate and proper hand position.


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Twins Adeel and Amber Arif of Ardsley proudly display their CPR Simulator, a free, downloadable app that teaches lifesaving skills and has been endorsed by Dr. Farrukh Jafri, co-medical director of urgent care at White Plains Hospital. (below, left).

photo by ali adnan

Ardsley High School seniors Adeel and Amber Arif put their smartphones to especially good use recently when the twin siblings created the AHS CPR Simulator, a mobile-phone application, which will be available to download for free in the future, that allows users to refine their CPR skills with the fun of a game format.

“Nowadays, we feel like almost everyone has a cellphone; even toddlers use cellphones,” Adeel says. “Mobile applications are perfect for reinforcing information for the modern era.”

The app focuses on CPR compression rate and proper hand position. When the game begins, the player will perform CPR on a cushion for one minute. As the game continues, their technique is highlighted in either green or red. Through experimental learning, the player is able to identify proper technique and make corrections as necessary. Reoccurring tips are also provided to further reinforce other CPR information.


photo courtesy of White Plains hospital

Dr. Farrukh N. Jafri, co-medical director of urgent care and assistant director of education and simulation at White Plains Hospital, mentored the twins throughout the process. “Every year, 475,000 Americans die from a cardiac arrest, and the majority of cardiac arrests happen outside a hospital,” Jafri says. “Bystander CPR is so important, and when performed correctly, it can double or even triple the chance of survival.”

With the help of Jafri, Doreen Mirante, Kelly Ellsworth, and Jodi Shulman of White Plains Hospital and the students’ teacher, Diana Evangelista, the twins claimed first place in the 2019 Westchester Science and Engineering Fair and are headed to the international competition in Arizona as international finalists.

“If we’re able to create something as high school students, I think that will definitely make a difference in the future,” Amber says.

 

 

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