Baked Stuffed Nectarine Recipe from Jill Rose of Chiboust Bistro & Bakery

It’s a more aromatic, no-fuzz peach—and this is the month nectarines shine.



Sibling rivalry starts early: One gets the straight hair, one gets the curly. And so it is with those late-summer darlings, peaches and nectarines. The smooth-skinned nectarine may be a mutation of the fuzzy peach, but take one bite and any rivalry becomes bliss. A rush of sweetness, a deluge of juice—no wonder they’re the season’s favorite children.

Like peaches, nectarines can be either yellow- or white-fleshed, clingstone or freestone. California grows 95 percent of them but, right now, New York is ascendant. Buy them ripe and unblemished at the greenmarket and keep them in a plastic bag, in the coldest part of the fridge, for up to five days. Your pie plates, jam jars, and ice-cream makers will be on high alert, but give them fair warning—the fruit may not make it past your quivering mouth.

Chef/Owner Jill Rose of Chiboust Bistro & Bakery (14 Main St, Tarrytown 914-703-6550; chiboust.com) declares the nectarine her favorite fruit. “Maybe it’s because, as a kid, I couldn’t deal with a peach’s fuzz,” she says, “but I love nectarines’ perfect skin and find them more versatile. They’re a little less sweet than peaches, with a melony depth and complexity.” And so they find their way into everything from her savory dessert soups to her cobblers and cocktails. 

A nectarine Mojito, anyone? A brunch of brioche French toast with nectarine compote?  A nectarine crumble with lemon custard, or perhaps the nectarine tart with house-made vanilla ice cream? Choosing may be a torment, but seldom has rivalry been more delicious.
 

Baked Stuffed Nectarines                                                                                                                                     

Courtesy of Jill Rose, Chiboust Bistro & Bakery
(Serves 6)

FOR COMPOTE FILLING:
¼ cup sugar                                                                                                                                           
1 cinnamon stick                                                                                                                                           
1 oz Riesling wine (or other fruit-forward wine)              
seeds from ½ vanilla bean (or ½ tsp 
  pure vanilla extract)
2 Tbsp butter                                                                                                                                          
4 very ripe nectarines, washed, seeded, and cut into medium dice

In a medium pan, bring all ingredients except nectarines to a simmer. Add nectarines and cook until softened and well combined. Set aside.

FOR STUFFED NECTARINES:                                                                                                                                     
6 medium-firm nectarines                                                                                                                                    
lemon juice, for brushing                                                                                                                                    
granulated sugar, for coating
6 ginger snaps or oatmeal cookies, crushed
Preheat oven to 375° F. Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water. With a paring knife, cut a small X on the bottom stem end of each nectarine. Submerge nectarines in boiling water for about 3 minutes, then remove and put into ice bath. When cooled, peel off skin with tip of paring knife. Push the pits through the stem end, being careful not to crush or break nectarines. Brush nectarines with lemon juice, roll in sugar, and place on greased cookie sheet.
Fold the crushed cookies into compote. Fill centers of whole nectarines with compote mixture. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, then remove from oven and place into bowls. Serve with vanilla ice cream or frozen Greek yogurt.               

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