Westchester Magazine's Guide to Fall 2011 Events and Activities in Westchester County, NY: Family Events, Things to Do with Kids, and More



[FAMILY]

 

 

❯❯❯ Children’s Book Day

September 25
Washington Irving’s Sunnyside
Kids have the rest of their lives to waste time on the Internet. While they’re young, keep them excited about children’s books. How? By taking them to meet some of their favorite authors and illustrators—and characters, too. The daylong festival of readings, signings, and meetings takes place in an apt locale, Washington Irving’s Sunnyside, the Hudson-side cottage of America’s first internationally famous writer.

 

 

 

❯❯❯ Sylvester and the Magic Pebble

October 29
The Emelin Theatre
William Steig is best known for his creation of Shrek and his best friend Donkey—but who remembers Steig’s other donkey character? The quieter one who runs afoul of a magic (backfiring) pebble? While a DreamWorks franchise of animated films may not be in store for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, the Enchantment Theatre Company has adapted the story for the stage—which also means you won’t have to hear Eddie Murphy’s braying voice.

❯❯❯ Pajama Party

November 12
Groove Performing Arts
Win/Win: kids get all the fun and excitement of a slumber party while the Pajama Program drums up donations. Admission to the party is free provided that attendees bring one new pair of pajamas or one new children’s book to donate to kids who are waiting to be adopted. Then they can boogie to the Groove House Band. The dress code?  Your best PJs, of course.

❯❯❯ The Star Keeper

November 19
The Performing Arts Center
If there’s an award for puppetry, Canada’s Théâtre de l’Œil has won it. It’s garnered a Citation awarded by UNIMA-USA, a Chalmers Canadian Play Award for Theatre for Young Audiences, and a prize from the Académie Québécoise du Théâtre. One of its most famous puppet productions, a magical tale called The Star Keeper, comes to the Performing Arts Center. The puppets in this show are so expressive that the production is wordless (and can be understood by kids ages three and up).

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