Westchester vs. New York City

Just a scant few miles means a world of difference in the way we live—but how? Consult our side-by-side comparison of all things urban and suburban, including who earns more money (care to guess?), who has a shorter commute (we do), who has access to more green space (look around you, Westchester), and everything else you’d need to put a City snob in his place.



-- Photo Description/Caption

Illustrations by Thomas James

At some point, you made a choice between urban living and suburban living. For some of you, the debate between the two ended the second you put down roots in Westchester. Maybe you never had doubts to begin with. For others, the struggle continues within. Every time you pay your tax bill, you think that you may have been better off with a cute little condo in Brooklyn Heights. (But would you have had to give up your washer/dryer for the indignity of the coin-op machine in the basement?) Then again, when you notice that you inadvertently left the house unlocked—again—and return to find your possessions untouched, you might revel in suburbia’s relative safety, and congratulate yourself for making such a smart choice.

It’s time to put the debate to rest. We may wonder about it every day, but how does life in New York City really compare to our suburban Westchester existences? We pit urban and suburban living head-to-head, piling in as many of the pertinent stats and facts as we could, to put the arguing to rest once and for all. Here, our (completely unbiased) findings.

City Mouse Hole vs. County Mouse Hole

Who pays more to live where—and what do you get for that money?
By Dave Donelson                                                                                           

Culture Clash

How do our beloved institutions compare?
                                                                                                                      

Our Towns: Just Who Lives Where?

Just who lives where?                                                                                     

The Saw Mill What?

Billy Altman braved the crowds of Washington Heights and the critters of Bear Mountain before finding Hastings-on-Hudson.

Restaurateur's Take

The trip from farm to table is a lot shorter in the suburbs.
By Julia Sexton                                                                                                      

Anything They Can Do We Can Do Better

A comparison of New York City and Westchester dining
By Julia Sexton                                                                                                      

Safety First

But who’s first in safety?
                                                                                                                      

Twist the Knife

How to not-so-subtly assert your geographical dominance in polite conversation

Adding It Up

Who has to hit the ATM more often?
By Philip Posillipo                                                                                                    

The Transplant

Sloane Crosley has lived on both sides of the border.
                                                                                                                    

A Train in Vain

Who has a rougher commute?
                                                                                                                       

How Does My Garden Grow

In Westchester, the world is your backyard—but Patricia Morrisroe wants to know what you plant in it.
By Patricia Morrisroe                                                                                     

Leading the Charge

What do our retail habits say about us as people?                                                                     

Chain Gang

Who can claim your favorite chain?
                                                                                                                       

Bottoms Up

Where’s the best place for night owls and big drinkers?                                 

Seeing Green

Which side of the fence has the greener grass?                                           

Dining Dilemma

Hugh Ryan bemoans—and celebrates—the lack of a dining room in his Brooklyn apartment.

 We Couldn’t Have Said It Better

Chosen the right side in the great Westchester vs. City debate? Wear your sentiments on your sleeve. Sure, Manhattan may have The Met and MoMA—but we have the changing-of-the-leaves. The tee, designed by Great To Be Here, is available in black for $24 at Weezie D. in Bronxville and Rye, and in coral (as shown) for women and navy for men for $24.99 at Parkers in Rye.

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module