Best Places to Live: Orienta, Mamaroneck

Orienta is a sought-after area defined by stately homes and gardens along Long Island Sound.


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photo: istock

Blueprint: While the village of Mamaroneck is characterized by its diverse middle-class neighborhoods,  lively downtown, and harbor, Orienta has remained one of Westchester’s most affluent areas since large waterfront manor homes were first built here, in the late 19th century.

Façade: Orienta is a sought-after area defined by stately homes and gardens along Long Island Sound. Developers often purchase land, demolish old homes and build new ones. Given the demand for this rarified community, it’s no wonder Mamaroneck is consistently rated one of the best places to live in New York.

Foundation: Several homes here were designed or inspired by the legendary architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, and many Orienta waterfront residences have private beaches. Home to the wealthiest New York financiers and celebrities of the late 19th and 20th centuries, the area became known as Hollywood in the East after renowned director D.W. Griffith set up a film studio here, in 1919.

Recent Reno: N/A

Trending: In the past year, prices have gone up 6.8 percent, says Chirag Shah of Gateway Realty. 

Selling Points: It’s close to the harbor and the Orienta Yacht Club, great commute, bigger parcels of land, situated between Larchmont and Mamaroneck.

Trade-off: Larger properties can mean less interaction with neighbors.

Starting Point: low $800,000s

Topping Out: $4.7M

Best For: families and empty nesters

Need to Know: prone to flooding

Fast Fact: The name “Orienta Point” is said to have been given by an early-20th-century resident who was so charmed by the splendor of the rising sun that it seemed “Oriental” in its beauty.

Assessment: an affluent community with a prime location on the Sound


Best Thing About Living Here: “It’s a beautiful place with water, beaches, and the marina nearby. I was lucky to grow up here and to raise my family here. It’s a friendly community. No one is pretentious.” —Andy Ackerman, longtime resident


 

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