Here's How to Spend a Day Trip to Nyack

Nyack gives Westchesterites plenty of reasons to cross the Cuomo Bridge.



Just 20 minutes from White Plains, Nyack gives Westchesterites plenty of reasons to cross the Cuomo Bridge. With only about 7,000 residents, the town supports more than its fair share of ultra-cool boutiques, bakeries, and restaurants, as well as a NYS park with destination-worthy Hudson River views.  

 

10:30 a.m.

Get a sweet start to your Saturday at Boxer Donut (18 N Franklin St). Grab a cup of the house Stumptown Coffee and pair it with a cold-proofed, yeasted or cake doughnut, whether it’s glazed and sprinkled or one of the creative rotating selections, like mango-chili-lime or the popular maple-bacon.


PHOTOS BY DOUG SCHNEIDER

 

11:30 a.m.

Nyack is the birthplace of iconic American realist painter Edward Hopper, and the Edward Hopper House Museum and Study Center (82 N Broadway) preserves his family home and pays tribute to his legacy. On the National Register of Historic Places, the nonprofit art center presents a selection of Hopper’s early works and memorabilia, as well as exhibits by contemporary artists throughout the year.

 

12:30 p.m.

Grab lunch at Art Cafe (65 S Broadway), an all-day café with an Israeli bend, serving generous salads, house-made hummus and labneh, and borekas stuffed with mushrooms, onion, and feta. Or, embrace cold-weather comfort food at Simard & Co. (4 S Broadway), a cheese shop with a short list of gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches, as well as pantry items you’ll want to take home, like CBD-infused honeys.

 

3 p.m.

Treat yourself to a stellar sweet treat. Pie Lady & Son (125 Main St), which moved to an expanded location earlier this year, has been serving delightfully old-fashioned Very Berry and apple-crumb pies to Nyack residents since 1966. If you prefer tarte Tatin, stop by Patisserie Didier Dumas (163 Main St), where the case is stacked with colorful macarons and dainty desserts of the French persuasion.

 

3:45 p.m.

Hit the shops, starting at stylish Saffron Trading Company (14 S Broadway), for home-décor items, like wood accent stools and woven baskets, that are natural, sustainable, and handmade by artisans under fair-working conditions. One block away is Hudson River Mercantile (6 N Broadway), which curates an eclectic mix of vintage,Mid-Century-design pottery and tableware in brightly colored, retro-chic patterns. Or, browse cushy armchairs, scented candles, gifts, and pretty printed dresses at [the editor] (15 N Broadway), housed in a 19th-century rowhouse.

 

5:30 p.m.

Backtrack to visit independent Pickwick Book Shop (8 S Broadway), in business since 1945. Crammed floor-to-ceiling with books, every nook and cranny has something to discover, from bestselling new releases by local authors to rare first editions older than the store itself. There are books, too, at Main Street Beat (95 Main St), but the combo clothing-book-record store’s main draw is its quirky selection of vintage ’80s clothing and vinyl.

 

6:30 p.m.

Don’t go home before dinner. At DPNB Pasta & Provisions (21 N Broadway), Chef Tony Scotto, whose résumé includes a Michelin-starred stint at NYC’s Del Posto, crafts near-perfect plates of fresh pasta. And family-run Filipino joint Karenderya (248 Main St) was named among the “Best New Restaurants in America” by Esquire in 2019, thanks to dishes like meltingly tender adobo pork belly.

 

 

 

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