Restaurant Preview: Pubstreet

International flavors and innovation accent this new American comfort food eatery.


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The Asian-inspired whole Branzino grilled with chili-lemongrass sauce.

pubstreet photographY by doug schneider

With “pub” in the moniker, one would be correct to expect American comfort fare such as burgers, wings, oysters, crispy Brussels sprouts, and salads, including roasted organic beets with goat cheese and oranges. But the 70-seat Pubstreet, located in the Metro-North station space that was once Iron Horse Grill, is helmed by Chef Mogan Anthony,  who appreciates international flavors and innovation. As the head chef overseeing Village Social (Mount Kisco, Rye) and Locali Pizza Bar (New Canaan), his signature dishes, like salty pretzel tuna and a pizza topped with clams, ’njuda sausage, shishito peppers, and Sichuan pepper shallots attest to his insistent passion for using global ingredients in inspired ways.

Thus the menu at Pubstreet is a balance of comfort food done in both recognizable — and unanticipated — ways. Buffalo chicken wings and fried calamari stand alongside starters of crispy kimchi tartar-dressed oyster sliders and clay pot-baked clams topped with Rice Krispies crumbs. Fritters are a salmon poke variety instead of more routine corn.

The baked clams, topped with Rice Krispies crumbs.

Mains include a classic lobster roll, fried chicken sandwich, grilled hanger steak, and excellent seafood ravioli in chive butter, but also a Japanese rice bowl with chicken and bacon dressed in kabayaki (a deep-brown, sweet soy sauce) and chili oil, plus grilled whole branzino done not with olive oil and herbs but with chili-lemongrass sauce and pineapple.  

“My background is pretty heavy on Japanese cuisine, so Pubstreet is an interesting take on a seafood or oyster bar,” explains Anthony. “We focus on quality without making things too complicated.” 

There’s in fact a preponderance of fish throughout the menu (9 of 14 entrées are seafood), including a full raw bar. Alex Aparicio, who was executive chef at Village Social in Rye, has moved to take over daily operation of Pubstreet’s kitchen.

The salmon poké sushi fritters with tamari glaze are exceptional.

The beverage program includes a short wine list of bottles, most between $30 and $70, five rotating taps, and cocktails, like a watermelon cooler and spicy blood-orange margarita made with fresh juices and in-house syrups.

The interior is done up in simple colors and lines: blonde-wood floors; medium-brown square tables; deep-buttoned, tufted, brown banquettes; and white-and-gray-blue walls.    

Says Anthony: “I have to give credit to owner Joe Bueti for the design concept — very stylishly comfortable and cozy, but not fine dining.”

Pubstreet
20 Wheeler Ave
Pleasantville 914.909.5408

 

 

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