Fare Well: Bona Fide


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Beef Bone Broth

Leslie Lampert tending to a pot of broth

They haven’t reached green drink status, but bone broths have emerged as the next on-trend health drink. If you thought chicken soup was good for you, imagine what super-concentrated chicken-bone broth can do.

Leslie Lampert of Ladle of Love did, which is why both chicken-bone broth ($9.75/pt) and beef-bone broth ($10.75/pt) were back on the menu as of mid-October.

Touted for its health benefits by everyone from food bloggers to certain celeb chefs to wellness experts, bone broth is high in protein and collagen and low in calories. The vitamins and minerals one gets from the broken-down bones purportedly have healing properties, e.g., helping alleviate joint and gut pain, boosting immune systems, and even making hair shiny.

If you’re wondering what the difference is between soup stock and bone broth, it’s all about time, labor, and patience. Lampert’s motto, in fact, is: “Patience and process are underrated,” and she and her staff bring this motto to life with each batch. 

While all stocks/broths start out by simmering meat and bones in a pot of water for a few hours, making bone broth is a much longer process. First, 30 pounds of bones are roasted to bring out the maximum flavor. Then they’re added to 8-gallon stockpots with meat, water, and aromatics — onions, carrots, etc. Carefully brought up to a simmer, the concoction is slowly cooked (and watched over) for a full 24 hours before it becomes rich and flavorful, and what started out as 8 gallons is now less than 4 gallons of concentrated goodness.

Lampert would like to see bone broth replace your afternoon coffee or tea and even the after-school snack for your kids. She might be on to something. What do you think, a caramel macchiato or a nutrient-rich bone broth?

Ladle of Love 
Mount Kisco 
www.ladleoflove.com

 

 

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