Best Bets: November

Our favorite reasons to get out of the house this month


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November 1

On Key

When Taka Kigawa (above) performs, people take note. Called a “phenomenon” by the New York Times, Kigawa is one of the most celebrated pianists ever to come out of Japan. Having performed in such venues as Carnegie Hall in New York City and Severance Hall in Cleveland, Kigawa is known for drawing crowds with his unique style, which combines influences ranging from baroque to the most experimental elements of contemporary classical music. In his return to the Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden, Kigawa will be performing significant modern and contemporary compositions designed to challenge and expand the piano’s boundaries (and likely the way audience members view the instrument as well). 

November 6

Night Moves

In the hit film, Night at the Museum, dinosaurs, mummies, and frightening animals spring to life. While the Bruce Museum’s Family Benefit: Night at the Museum may not have so many breathing beasts, it will undoubtedly offer just as much fun. The family-focused event will feature a movie on the museum’s big screen, along with a scavenger hunt, silent auction, craft activities, pizza, and dessert. Even adults won’t be left out in the cold, as the event will also have an open bar serving wine and beer. Kids are encouraged to come dressed in their pajamas for this evening of food, fun—and, hopefully, no living dinosaurs.  

November 6-22

All Dolled Up

Some say that domesticity was never the same after Henrik Ibsen’s groundbreaking play, A Doll’s House, first hit the stage in 1879. Telling the story of a constrained housewife fed up with her domestic life, the play and its unprecedented ending still reverberates to this day. Director John Michael DiResta breathes new life into this celebrated masterpiece, at Pleasantville's Axial Theatre this month,  by reimagining it in 1950s America. The jump 70-plus  years forward provides the seminal drama with a greater connection to contemporary audiences as well as a fresh, but no less impactful, perspective. 

November 8

To Market, To Market

There aren’t too many places where you can pick up antique furniture, comic books, jewelry, and a wealth of collectibles all in one visit. But you can do just that at the Hastings Flea, a specialty, curated outdoor flea market that takes place each month in the MTA commuter parking lot beside the river in Hastings-on-Hudson. Even if you don’t pick up your next family heirloom from one of the local vendors hawking home goods, crafts, and more antiques than you can shake a stick at, you can still enjoy live entertainment, animals, and a fleet of local food options.

November 8– February 21

Just Bead It

Tired of art exhibitions that feature one painting after another, with little difference between the individual pieces other than the images that they depict? Enter Liza Lou and her pioneering style that blends 3D sculpture, glasswork, textiles, crafts, and painting to produce truly one-of-a-kind artworks. In her new exhibition at the Neuberger Museum of Art, Lou’s artistic range will be on full display with her two new pieces Color Field, a large-scale sculpture composed almost entirely of glass beads, and Solid Gray, a series of smaller monochromatic woven beaded works. With Color Field taking up an astonishing 1,400 square feet of gallery space, it will be hard to miss this giant artistic leap forward. 

November 13

Laugh Factory

As Howard Stern’s former right-hand man, Artie Lange is known for pulling no punches whatsoever when it comes to cracking jokes. With his signature blend of bawdy humor and ribald ridiculousness, Lange is one of the most famous—and infamous—comedians performing today. Lange will undoubtedly bring along this ultra-edgy humor when he hits the stage at The Paramount Hudson Valley in Peekskill this month. As co-host of “The Artie Lange Show,” a program he created for the Fox News Network, and author of the New York Times bestselling memoir Too Fat to Fish, Lange has more than enough up his sleeve when it comes to coarse comedy. 

November 14

Folk Hero

People throw the word “legend” around all the time, but Arlo Guthrie is legit. Along with his late father, Woody Guthrie, Arlo is one of the most important and widely known folk singers in American history. On tour to celebrate the impending 50th anniversary of his satirical counter-culture classic “Alice’s Restaurant,” Guthrie will perform live at the Tarrytown Music Hall this month. Taking Guthrie more than a year to finish, “Alice’s Restaurant” defined an entire generation with its anti-war message and spurred countless individuals to take up the banner of social action, peace, and human rights. 

 

 

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