Did You Know?: Westchester Docs Tell What They Think We Should Know

From Lyme's Disease to asthma, local doctors tell some health truths



“Cardiovascular disease is still the number-one cause of death for men and women in the US.”   —Michael Silver, MD, cardiovascular disease 
“In Westchester, we now have four additional deer-tick-transmitted infections besides Lyme disease, all of which can be rapidly diagnosed if the appropriate testing is requested.” —Gary Wormser, MD, infectious disease
“We are fortunate that Westchester County has the top level of medical care, quality doctors and nurses in the community hospitals, and also equipment that hospitals can obtain. Patients can get the latest spine and brain surgery with the greatest safety, and some patients can go home in the same day.”  —Ezriel Kornel, MD, neurological surgery 


“A persistent cough can be the only sign of asthma." —Kira Geraci-Ciardullo, MD, allergy & immunology 

“Many people fear that wearing corrective lenses will weaken the eyes and increase their dependence on glasses. This is generally not true. [Also] while cataract surgery can be performed on even the most minimal cataracts, prudence demands that we wait until the benefits of surgery outweigh the risks.” —James R. Gordon, MD, ophthalmology 

“Early prostate cancer is essentially asymptomatic. So, despite all the controversy, PSA [prostate-specific antigen] and digital rectal examinations are still very important in the timely diagnosis of this common malignancy.” —David S. Breslin, MD, urology 


What's New

“In my 40 years of practicing radiology, 3D tomosynthesis mammography is the most significant breakthrough in breast-cancer screening, and I recommend it for all women in the age group for screening. This technology has been shown to find more breast cancers than traditional mammography while reducing false positives.” —Diane LoRusso, MD, diagnostic radiology 

“Cancer therapy is changing extremely rapidly. Drugs are being developed every month targeting specific changes in tumors, with much less toxicity.” —Elizabeth Phillips, MD, medical oncology 

“The good news about cardiovascular disease is that we have increasingly effective treatments, and many cardiovascular problems—diseases of the arties and valves—are now very treatable, if not preventable.” —Richard H. Kay, MD, cardiovascular disease

“Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of options for treating psychiatric symptoms and illnesses, including multiple types of psychotherapy and medications with increased effectiveness and less side effect.” —Rebecca Dulit, MD, psychiatry


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