Meet Manny Lozano, Executive Chef of Bistro Rollin


Chef Lozano’s career in restaurant kitchens began straight out of high school when he went to work at an Italian restaurant in his home town of White Plains that was owned by the family of one of his close friends. These early years were when he discovered his passion for cooking.

As evidence of Manny’s considerable skills and creativity emerged over the ensuing 20 years he took advantage of the opportunity to work with some of New York's greatest chefs. At March with Wayne Nish, with Charlie Palmer at Aureole, and probably most importantly with Jean-Michel Bergougnoux, the Chef-Owner at L'Absinthe.

Manny’s work at March was a turning point in his career as Chef Nish recommended him to his friend Jean-Michel, which quickly led to Manny’s move to L’Absinthe and ultimately his elevation to sous-chef, a role he had for six years in the award-winning kitchen.

During his years at L’Absinthe Chef Lozano was married, had a son moved to Mamaroneck and was looking to work closer to home. His next move was to assist his friend Chris Eddy (also a L’Absinthe veteran) in the start-up of the restaurant at Winvian, a reknowned Relaix and Chateau resort inn in Morris, Connecticut. In addition to assisting in all aspects of getting the restaurant off the ground he also held the role of chef de cuisine. With this wealth of experience behind him Chef Lozano started looking to run his own kitchen in Westchester, and he did not have to look long.

Shortly thereafter he and the Bratone family got together to start Bistro Rollin. The Bratones were new to the restaurant business but were absolutely certain they needed someone experienced in start-ups and who had worked in top-rated establishments.

In Chef Lozano they have someone who consistently applies classic French cooking techniques to a fresh, modern bistro menu that continues to amaze.

Dish I Do Best My cooking is always evolving, as any art would. Therefore, what I think one day is my best work can get topped by something else later. I hope this continues.

Drink of Choice Ginger Ale—GuS Ginger Ale, because it isn’t too sweet.

Favorite Guilty Pleasure Food A good homemade lasagna Bolognese—lasagna made simply with ragu, béchamel, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, and lots of love. Please don’t add ricotta and/or mozzarella.

Favorite Cuisine French, because it is mostly what I am involved with, almost like a relationship.

Culinary Hero Harold McGee [McGee writes about the science of food and cooking; his column, “The Curious Cook, runs in the New York Times].

Favorite Kitchen Culinary Utensil The spoon. For me, it is the most versatile. It allows me to taste, baste, and it often takes the place of a spatula. I check the viscosity of sauces by how the sauce coats the back of the spoon.

Last Book Read I am actually in and out of The Complete Robuchon these days. Wow!

I Never Eat... Avocado, because I get a bad reaction. Otherwise, I’d probably really like avocado. I guess I like everything.

Favorite Place to Dine Out The Blue Ribbon in Manhattan. For me, it’s accessible to people in the industry. The kitchen is open until four a.m. and my three favorites there are the beef marrow and oxtail marmalade, escargot, and foie gras terrine. Perfect every time. Did I mention that French food is my favorite?

 

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