Healthy. Wealthy. Wise



There’s a reason that “healthy” comes first. So, though our current economic situation may have you constantly scrambling to take care of the “wealthy” part, it’s important that we remember to slow down, take a deep breath, and take care of ourselves.

Luckily, we have an army of professionals in the county reminding us to do this very thing. In our eighth annual Top Doctors issue, we take the time to recognize those that have been selected by their peers as the best men and women to trust with our hearts, our lungs, our skin, our bones, our brains—and just about everything else. In this issue, we’ve provided the names of more than 150 doctors, each of whom has gone through a rigorous vetting process, and each of whom works right here in Westchester. That’ll save you money on trips into the city, so we’re looking out for your “wealthy” part, too.

If you need further proof that a few trips to the doctor can change your life, read on. We have essays from two of our writers whose lives were affected by medicine in very different ways. Dave Donelson seeks all types of treatments from a variety of different specialists to relieve an ever-present back pain (see page 92), while Diane Weintraub Pohl was able to use in vitro fertilization and surrogate gestation to finally complete her family (see page 89). In addition, we give a roundup of amazing medical breakthroughs that might inspire an essay or two in the future.
So let’s remember to take care of our health this year. In the end, wouldn’t that make us all a little wise?

On another matter altogether…
I have two really smart sons, both of whom have announced that they are not going to vote in this year’s elections. The reason? They don’t believe that their individual vote matters. Unlike their mother, my sons are math whizzes: the younger graduated Brown summa cum laude with a degree in mathematics; the elder is working on his PhD in economics at Harvard. So, yes, smart. And they can spew out lots of statistical proof for their position.

My boys may very well be right—statistically, mathematically speaking. But you can be sure that I will be casting my vote on November 4. New York is hardly a battleground state in the election. But, particularly in this crazy, scary time, I want to do my job as a citizen, to perform, even celebrate the ritual of voting. My ancestors back in the old country had no say in their government. I don’t care what my math-minded sons say: a chance to weigh in on who is going to be governing me is too valuable, too sacred to squander. Incidentally, my daughter, who is also really smart, will be voting.

 

 

Esther Davidowitz
Editor-in-Chief

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module