Hawaiian Poké Popping Up on Local Menus

Just in time for summer, the ubiquitous Hawaiian dish is the new thing to try.


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First of all, it’s pronounced POH-KAY – and Hawaiians love it. Visit any of the islands, and you’ll find it everywhere from surf shacks and grocery-store deli counters to restaurants. Hawaiian for “to cut,” poké can be made with cubed raw fish, cooked seafood, or even tofu, simply marinated and served solo or over rice or greens. 

photographs by andre baranowski

Moderne Barn

Armonk; 914.730.0001

This classic tuna-belly version is marinated in soy, ginger, scallion, and sesame oil; tossed with black and white sesame seeds; and served over a seaweed salad. 

 

The Barley House

Thornwood; 914.495.3333

Ahi tuna poké with cucumber, chili flakes, and toasted sesame oil is served over greens or Israeli couscous at this Thornwood spot known for its burgers and bar bites.  

 

Exit 4 Food Hall

Mount Kisco; 914.241.1200

Choose from four types of poké rice bowls including bigeye tuna, avocado, and seaweed salad with ginger, soy, and sesame; salmon with edamame, masago, and hot sesame oil; or tuna in spicy mayo.

 

Saltaire

Port Chester; 914.939.2425

At this seafood spot, cubes of king salmon skip the shoyu in favor of bright Japanese citrus, crunchy peanuts, and Thai basil and mint.  

 

 

 

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