What to Do in Westchester in January

Our favorite reasons to get out of the house this month


Published:

January 13

A Wail of a Good Time 
Bob Marley’s beloved band is just as vibrant and vivacious as it was when the legendary reggae great was still taking the stage. Originally founded by Marley, Peter Tosh, and Bunny Livingston, The Wailers’ current lineup boasts such reggae greats as Aston “Family Man” Barrett, Junior Marvin, and Donald Kinsey. This month, The Wailers will be lighting up the Tarrytown Music Hall on the heels of their 2016 reformation. Watch as one of the world’s most famous reggae bands demonstrates just why they have been a force to be reckoned with for more than 40 years. 

 

January 14

Ryme Time
Believe it or not, a musician that once played alongside artists such as Bob Dylan, Dave Matthews, and members of the Grateful Dead now produces some of the country’s finest children’s music. The two-time Grammy-nominated Brady Rymer and the Little Band That Could are bringing their signature songs to Mamaroneck’s Emelin Theatre. Now on his seventh full-length album, Rymer is beloved for his fun and funky songs bearing influences ranging from Americana to zydeco. Having been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and on the pages of the New York Times, this big-name children’s musician is worth a watch by any curious kid. 

 

January 20 - February 11

Hyde and Seek
Top-notch theater doesn’t have to be tame. Exhibit A: The Elmwood Playhouse’s new adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s groundbreaking novella Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Telling the tale of a scientist who unlocks a monster lurking within him, this forward-thinking play directed by Debra Lee Failla presents an innovative take on the celebrated story. The Nyack-based Playhouse will present this production set in Victorian England with multiple actors assuming the role of Hyde, each embodying a different facet of the deeply troubled scientist. Buckle up, and get ready for an utterly singular view of one not-so-singular protagonist.

 

January 22

Storm Kings
With more than 3,000 live shows under their belts, Gaelic Storm must be doing something right. The multinational, award-winning, Irish-inspired group has been playing together for nearly 20 years to worldwide acclaim. Their latest release, Matching Sweaters, adds a modern twist to the group’s signature blend of traditional Irish tunes. The group will be taking the stage at the Paramount Hudson Valley Theater in Peekskill with a rare performance that fuses bluegrass, country, jam, and rock music with the traditional sounds of the Emerald Isle.

 

January 28

Chamber Made
Sometimes an evening of classical music should mean more than just a choice between Beethoven and Bach. That’s where The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center comes in, with a varied catalogue of compositions ranging from legendary icons to contemporary innovators. This month, the Society will be taking the stage at the Performing Arts Center at Purchase College with a selection of works by Brahms and Fauré. Widely known as the nation’s premier repertory company, the Chamber Music Society is led by acclaimed directors David Finkel and Wu Han — two of the biggest names in contemporary classical. 

 

January 28

West World
Two movies that define the evolving spirit of the modern Western will be shown back to back this month at the Jacob Burns Film Center. Akira Kurosawa’s monumental samurai flick Yojimbo, in which a sword master pits two warring businessmen against each other, will run alongside the Clint Eastwood epic For a Few Dollars More, a film directly influenced by Kurosawa’s masterpiece. This 1965 spaghetti western helmed by Sergio Leone follows Eastwood’s “Man in Black” as he hunts for a ruthless fugitive. Both films offer varied perspectives on this enduring cinematic genre, detailing the incredible ways in which international directors sought to reinvigorate the Western.  

 

Ongoing through May 14

A Room of One’s Own
This month, The Edward Hopper house in Nyack presents a truly unique look at a celebrated artist with their new show, Edward Hopper’s Bedroom Reimagined. This inventive restaging transforms the artist’s bedroom into a showcase designed in period style by the architect Walter Cain, and Ernest de La Tore, a renowned designer featured in Architectural Digest.  Based on paintings and historical documents, the room in which the renowned artist spent his evenings until age 28 is given a new look that typifies Hopper’s artistic development and aestetic, as well as his appreciation for the “Hudson River light” of Nyack. Both the beauty and inspiration of Hopper’s early life are vividly presented in this distinctive experience.

 

 

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