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Craig Zalvan, MD, Medical Director of Phelps’ Institute for Voice and Swallowing Disorders, recommends taking this quick test to find out if you might have Silent Reflux.


Within the last month, how did the following problems affect you?
0 = No Problem 5 = Significant Problem

Hoarseness or a problem with your voice
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Clearing your throat
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Excess throat mucus or post-nasal drip
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Difficulty swallowing food, liquids or pills
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Coughing after you eat or lie down
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Breathing difficulties or choking episodes
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Troublesome or annoying cough
 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Sensation of something sticking in your
throat or a lump in your throat

0

1

2

3

4

5

Heartburn, chest pain, indigestion or
stomach acid coming up

0

1

2

3

4

5

If your score is greater than 10, then there is a high likelihood that you have silent reflux, also known as laryngopharyngeal reflux or LPR. LPR is not GERD. You do not have to have heartburn, indigestion or abdominal symptoms to have LPR.

Symptoms of LPR include chronic cough, voice changes, chronic throat clearing, burning in the throat or feeling of a lump in the throat. Patients with these symptoms are often told they have asthma, sinus disease or post-nasal drip.

If you have any of these symptoms and your score is greater than 10, an examination by a laryngologist (ear, nose and throat physician specializing in voice and swallowing disorders) is recommended to help treat your problem, screen for esophageal disease (including cancer), and prevent the long-term complications of reflux in the upper airway.

To arrange a consultation with Dr. Zalvan at the Institute for Voice and Swallowing Disorders, please call (914) 366-3636.

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