Ossining in 3D: Honoring the Village’s 200th Birthday

Sculptures scattered around libraries, churches, and the rest of the town commemorate the village’s history



Water Course by Elaine Lorenz

Driving down the streets and up the hills of the River Town of Ossining, one might wonder how and where a mile-and-a-half-long sculpture garden would fit, but Ossining in 3D, the sculpture project the village’s Bicentennial Committee launched this May in celebration of its 200th anniversary as a village recognized by the State of New York, is omnipresent, with works integrated amongst buildings and on the grounds of numerous landmark properties.

The exhibition serves not only to commemorate the village’s bicentennial, but also to bring attention to its well-preserved historical architecture. According to Village Manager Richard Leins, Ossining in 3D entails “a six-month juried show of large sculptures to celebrate the village’s historical architecture in the context of modern sculpture.” 

With its approachable charm, the sculpture garden—planted in spaces like the public library, Trinity Episcopal Church, and along the waterfront—is publically accessible. And the art itself? The Bicentennial Committee advertised the project nationally and received more than 70 submissions from artists across the country. From those, they chose 25 sculptures to be placed around the village. 

Homenaje a Carlos Zook by Peter Barrett Woman In The Sun Seated by Leonda Froehlich Finke

 

Water Course, by New Jersey based artist Elaine Lorenz, is located by the First Baptist Church, near Main and Church Streets. Inspired by water running through canyons, the sculpture’s radiant blues and fluid curvatures are a stark contrast against the traditional, linear brick sanctuary. Of the location, Lorenz says, “I loved the idea of putting sculptures in
ordinary places. Having people walking their dogs come talk to me was really wonderful.”

The work of artist Eric Barrett, Homenaje a Carlos Zook, conveys the sense of inclusion at the heart of Ossining in 3D. The steel sculpture pays tribute to Carlos Zook, a quadriplegic man whom Barrett met while studying Spanish at Middlebury College. The wall-like structure features an open doorway with a ramp going through it, which offers visitors a spectacular view, especially at
sunset. 

The doorway represents an accessible passageway, and Barrett is thrilled by the thought of having people from the community interact with it. “This [piece] is meant to be used. You can see a bike track on the ramp—I love that. To see somebody go through it with a wheelchair, for me, would be a thrill, because that would be Carlos.”

Heritage Two by Insun Kim

 Click here to see more in this month's web exclusive.


 

 

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