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Crémaillère Confusion

 

I am very confused by the restaurant review last month of La Crémaillère in Bedford by Julia Sexton. My husband and I absolutely adore this restaurant and always have a wonderful time there! The beautiful photographs, the captions under the photographs, and the actual article itself describes “Crème de la Crème Cuisine at La Crémaillère Restaurant.” We are very disappointed in the author’s choice to rate this outstanding, beautiful, delicious restaurant anything less than outstanding. The rating presented by this author is, in our opinion, not consistent or valuable in
describing La Crémaillère. Upon seeing the rating, my first thought was that
it was a typographical error.

 

      The word crémaillère refers to the hook that holds a pot in the hearth over the flame...it is in France a symbol of hospitality and neighborly gatherings. The wonderful food and service we always experience at La Crémaillère is a tribute to the name of the restaurant.

 

Mrs. Barbara Rempfer Bedford Support for Emily Shaw’s

 

I was surprised by the comments your restaurant reviewer had about Emily Shaw’s (“Inn Out of Focus at Pound Ridge” in July 2007). Since it opened, I have eaten there at least 20 times and have had an excellent meal each time. Of the dozen or so people who have gone there on my reccomendation, I have had raves from each. Maybe you should revisit, because your reviewer really missed the mark.

 

Dylan Jones

Bedford

 

Weighty Issue

 

The June article entitled “Weighty Choices” about surgery and obese kids really resonates in the month that the Westchester County Department of Health released its data that 34 percent of students in kindergarten, second, and fourth grade are overweight or close to it, a percentage higher than the national average. These figures were based on data collected on 8,600 elementary school children in 19 of 40 districts in Westchester.

 

Because obesity is an inflammatory disease and therefore associated with multiple comorbidities and reduced quality of life as well as lifespan, the key is prevention. It is no longer as simple as calories in vs. calories out.

 

Parents are often afraid to say “no” regarding food for fear of starting an eating disorder. When the focus is on health, and not weight, that does not happen. There are multiple studies to support nutrition education for the whole family, not just the obese child. After all, it is about total health for everyone.

 

While surgery may be the only option for a child at significant risk, it should be considered a last resort. The article describes the band as a safe and effective option.

We need to love our children with lots of good healthy food: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and much less processed and refined foods and drinks.

 

Geri Brewster, RD, MPH, CDN Registered Dietitian-Certified Nutritionist

Scarsdale

 

 

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