We Can’t Keep Secrets



It doesn’t matter if you’ve made Westchester home for the past 30 years or just moved into the county—everyone wants to know the inside scoop. We all want to know how to work the county to get the very most out of it. So who better to give out the inside scoop than, well, we, the editors of Westchester Magazine?

After all, it’s our job to know this county as well as that old librarian with the thick glasses knows the Dewey Decimal System. We schmooze, we badger, we yack, we read, and we inquire every chance we get to receive just one more kernel of information so we can share it with you. Readers, you are our raison d’être; we, your eyes and ears for everything good, new, fun, important, interesting, etc. in Westchester. Ergo, we asked Features Editor Nancy Claus, who has called Westchester home for the past 25 years, to ferret out all the little secrets, helpful hints, and nuggets of knowledge that make life in the county even more enjoyable. That is, to report and write our first Insider’s Guide to Westchester (turn to page 67).

We also asked Westchester Magazine’s award-winning food writer Julia Sexton, who grew up and still lives in New Rochelle, to throw in her insider information on the county dining scene. In case you’re wondering where to find duck tongues or fertilized Filopino eggs, look no further. (By the way, for Julia’s weekly insider information, sign up to receive her ’tude-filled e-newsletter, Eat.Drink.Post. Visit westchestermagazine.com; click on “Subscribe to Our Newsletters” on the home page).

“I can’t keep a secret, that’s true,” Nancy says. “And when I know where to get your hair colored or cut—for free—or how to get tickets to sold-out events, when the best sales are, even the best place to take your kids for their driving tests, it seems almost criminal not to share.” We agree.

If you have any insider tip we may have missed, do let us know at edit@westchestermagazine.com. But beware: we’re bound to share it with our other (300,000-plus) readers.

NYU journalism professor Mitchell Stephens loves sports—a lot. So when we wanted to profile Rye resident Mike D’Antoni, the New York Knicks coach, we knew whom to ask. Mitch was thrilled—particularly because he got to watch the Knicks practice.

Says Mitch, “I was sitting in practice at Greenburgh—the lone visitor for a little while—watching players practice their shots: rebound, pass, shoot; rebound, pass, shoot—over and over again; then from another spot, and another, and another. Listening to that sweet sound of the ball slipping, unobstructed, through the net—four times in a row, five times in a row. For a fan, who can connect numbers with names, it is a thrill to see them, to get a sense of their unearthly height and talent, to understand how hard they do work for their millions and to realize, too, how young most of these players are.” His piece appears on page 46.

Esther Davidowitz
Editor-in-Chief

 

 

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