Overeat During the Holidays? Here's How to Recover

We asked an expert just how to bounce back after long winter months of gobbling candy canes, cakes, and cookies.


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When the snow finally thaws, many find that winter left a little gift in the form of a less-than-svelte body. Though temperatures are still plenty low, now might be the best time to get the jump on recovering from all those tasty treats. We asked dietary expert Jodi Baretz, author of the book Mindful is the New Skinny, just how to bounce back after a long season of holiday overeating.

Stick to whole, healthy foods. “Limit or eliminate processed foods and sugar,” advises Baretz. “Concentrate on protein and vegetables, and small portions of carbohydrates. Carbs turn into sugar, but don’t be afraid of portion size healthy fats like avocado, olive oil and nuts.”

Ignore negativity. “Snap yourself out of any negative self-talk,” says Baretz. “You may have gone off the rails for a week or so, but lets face it, you’re not a horrible person. Notice when you are beating yourself up, and redirect that energy to planning your next meal.”

Eat intuitively. “Slow down your eating and pay attention to how you feel; honor the fact that your body knows what it wants,” suggests Baretz. “If you eat mindfully — even treats — it is much easier to stay on the healthy track overall. Plan your meals and make sure what you are eating is what you want to be putting in your mouth. Taste your food, eat slowly, and enjoy the bites.”

Routine, routine, routine. “Now that the holidays are over, you need to get back to your routine of home cooked meals, and your favorite go-to healthy foods,” advises Baretz. “Simply by eliminating all the restaurant meals, holiday parties, and traveling — and getting back to your exercise routine — you will naturally get back on track.”

Photo blog your food. “Instead of a food journal, take a picture of everything you eat before you eat it,” says Baretz. “This will make you pause before you eat, make you accountable, and help stop mindless snacking.”

Plan ahead to avoid the grab.  “Always have fruits veggies and healthy snacks readily available in your kitchen so you are not tempted to grab junk food,” says Baretz. “Don’t go too long without eating or you will be starving and tempted to grab.”

 

 

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