Mamaroneck-Based Project Veritas Alleged Source of False Roy Moore Accusation Meant to Discredit the Washington Post

A woman approached reporters with an inconsistent story, part of an apparent failed sting operation.


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Image via Washington Post

The Washington Post is reporting that a woman who approached its reporters to make further accusations against Republican Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore did so as part of an apparent failed sting operation.

In addition to Jaime T. Phillips' inconsistent and unverifiable claims of Moore impregnating her as a teenager, Phillips seemed particularly interested in assurance that her story would cause Moore to lose his political race. Fact-checking her background led to the discovery of a GoFundMe page under the same name, seeking funds to help relocate to New York for employment by “the conservative media movement to combat the lies and deceit of the liberal MSM [Mainstream Media]." After repeated meetings, reporters followed the woman from her home to the Mamaroneck offices of Project Veritas.

Project Veritas is a registered 501(c) tax-exempt organization originally incorporated in Virginia in 2010 and which moved to Mamaroneck in 2012. The organization’s web page bills its mission as to “investigate and expose corruption, dishonesty, self-dealing, waste, fraud, and other misconduct in both public and private institutions in order to achieve a more ethical and transparent society.”

Project Veritas has previously come under fire for releasing highly edited videos that purport to show employees at organizations such NPR, the New York Times, and Planned Parenthood engaging in illicit or biased behavior. The organization’s president James O’Keefe pled guilty in 2010 to a misdemeanor of entering a federal building under false pretense, after a failed attempt to perform a similar sting on Louisiana Senator Mary Landreau. Failing to disclose this conviction cost the organization its fundraising abilities in both Mississippi and Utah.

While O’Keefe refused to comment to Washington Post reporters at the time, he later came outside to speak with journalist Aaron C. Davis, though he did not answer any questions regarding the employment of the potential fraudster. He has since tweeted a highly edited video of these events which omit many of Davis’ queries. Both this video and the recording made by the Post can be viewed here.

Project Veritas has not responded to our requests for comment as of the time of this writing, and the website’s contact form has been deactivated.

 

 

 

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