In Reversal, Ossining Votes To Allow Beekeeping

After a recent vote, honey bees might finally be able to call Ossining home.



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The Ossining Village Board of Trustees voted this week to override a long-standing ordinance against beekeeping, clearing the way for honey bee hives and beekeepers to make a local comeback in the village.

The new legislation, “Revisions to Chapter 75 ‘Animals’ to Require Apiary Registration,” also establishes safe beekeeping standards and protection for the bees. For some, the legislation may seem inconsequential, but to others, the Board’s decision was seen as a godsend.

“I am very excited and extremely grateful that the Village Trustees voted for the bees’ sake,” said Sister Bette Ann, a member of The Dominican Sisters of Hope in Ossining. “We plan to tend our own bees as part of creating a sustainable and hospitable environment. It’s wonderful to partner with the Village board and their amazing staff in this transformation.”

Bees—honey bees especially—are of great important to the environment and human health. According to the American Beekeeping Federation, approximately one third of all food consumed in the U.S. is directly or indirectly derived from honeybee pollination. Not to mention, roughly 75% of all flowering plants rely on animal pollinators such as bees to survive. The USDA estimates that bee pollination adds $15 billion of value to the US agricultural industry every year.

Under Ossining’s Village Code, beekeepers must submit registration forms and adhere to strict guidelines in order to maintain their apiaries. Those who fail to comply with the legislation will be denied the ability to set up apiaries in the future.

The legislation is available to view online here.

Courtest of The Village Of Ossining

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