Weddings

Your Guide to Bespoke Invitations

From money-saving tips to what’s currently on trend



Photos Courtesy of Laura Damiano Designs

As ‘unique’ becomes the buzzword for wedding planning, brides and grooms think about ways to personalize everything from the wedding feast to the first dance song.

The key to setting the tone for your big day: truly one-of-a-kind invitations. To find out more, we chatted up Briarcliff Manor-based designer Laura Damiano — and owner of Laura Damiano Designs — who creates bespoke designs for couples who know that gorgeous invites are the first step to a special celebration. 

 

Courtesy of Caitlin Chadwick Photography

 

What kind of services do you offer?

Laura Damiano Designs is an award-winning company featuring one-of-a-kind, bespoke stationery, which expresses the unique personalities and stories surrounding important life events. I design hand-created pieces that depict the individual style of my clients, and there is no limit to the style, color, creativity, or fonts. I offer everything from custom invitations to seating cards, signage, or any other stationery needs to go along with our couple’s big day.

 

What’s involved in creating a bespoke design for couples?

[Designs are based around] one-on-one work with the couple. I discuss multiple ideas and every detail in its entirety. Each piece is different than the next and is never reproduced. Since I do all custom work [pieces are never reproduced], prices vary based on quantity, components, and materials. Prices can be anywhere from $800 to $5,000 depending on what a couple wants to incorporate.

 

 

The invitation and save the date are the first impressions guests have of a wedding. What are some ways to make them standout?

Do something different, whether it’s the shape, color, material, or printing method. Even something traditionally designed has wow-factor potential if you are open to trendy options.

 

Speaking of trends, what’s hot right now?

Different materials — paper, cork, acrylic, metal and wood — and a lot of customized shapes. I also think foil stamping, wax seals, and vellum paper will be pretty strong going into next year.

 

 

What are some of your favorite past projects?

My favorite was a custom-die-cut floral invitation for Madison and Brett. The combo of navy and marsala with vintage details really made this suite gorgeous — and won an award. For Jeanine and James’ save-the-date, I created a double-card, swivel luggage tag. They travel a great deal so depicting that was very important to them. I carried the theme and styling through their invitation with a custom, compass wax seal.

 

With invites, menus, programs, and everything else, the cost of stationery can really add up. What are some smart ways to save a few bucks without compromising too much on style?

Cut down on cards and unnecessary details. For example, envelope liners are pretty when photographed, but realistically guests rip the invitation open without appreciating the beautiful detail inside. Put the emphasis on your main invitation, and consider other ways to get additional details to your guests, whether it’s with a wedding website or by combining other information on one card.

 

 

What are three things you wish you could tell couples about stationery for their wedding day?

1. It’s the introduction to your wedding and a keepsake, so you want your stationery to make a statement.

2. Details are key. Be creative while keeping to the style you are trying to achieve.

3. Be consistent. I’ve seen so many mismatched colors and fonts across different pieces of a couple’s stationery. Remember, everything is being photographed for memories.

 

 

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module