Westchester at the Golden Globes



Did any of you watch the Golden Globes on Sunday, or were you all tuckered out from watching the Jets beat the Patriots? If you skipped the awards, I'll fill you in on the only ones you need to know about: The ones with local connections. Who were our big winners?

I know we've talked about Temple Grandin a ton of times already. Seeing as it was a TV movie—and, being on HBO, a good one—it's been handed a million awards at previous telecasts, including the Emmy for "Outstanding Made for Television Movie" (one of the seven Emmy awards it took home). Well, Grandin returns to capture more awards praise. Unfortunately, it didn't take home the Golden Globe for "Best Mini-Series"—that went to Carlos this time. But Claire Danes won a statue for "Best Actress in a Mini-series or TV Movie” for her portrayal of Grandin, who applauded from the audience. And, right next to her at the table, sat the movie's executive producer, Larchmont resident Emily Gerson Saines. I had a chance to speak with Gerson Saines before the movie aired and learn what a personal project it was for her, so I always feel pretty excited for her when I see the film take home some big awards.

An even bigger awards-hog that night, though, was The Social Network, which brought home honors for "Best Original Score," "Best Screenplay," "Best Director," and "Best Motion Picture - Drama." The local connection here is obvious: The film is based loosely on the life of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, a Dobbs Ferry native. (We don't really need to break out the screen-shot from the trailer of him wearing an Ardsley t-shirt again, do we?) So, really, without Westchester, there'd be no Social Network.

But there is another big local connection to The Social Network. (Not counting the fact that the film's David Fincher snaked his "Best Director" award away from David O. Russell, director of The Fighter, who attended Mamaroneck High School.) The Social Network's writer, Aaron Sorkin, is also a local, graduating from Scarsdale High School, a sometimes-sorta rival school from Zuckerberg's middle-school alma mater. During his acceptance speech, though, Sorkin proved that there are no hard feelings (even though Sorkin's screenplay vision of Zuckerberg is pretty harsh). "I wanted to say to Mark Zuckerberg tonight: If you're watching, Rooney Mara's character makes a prediction at the beginning of the movie. She was wrong," he said. "You turned out to be a great entrepreneur, a visionary, and an incredible altruist." Watch his speech here:
 

 
Did your favorite movies win the Golden Globes? Were you rooting for Russell over Fincher? Let me know in the comments. And if the Globes didn't shake out the way you wanted them to, don't beat yourself up about it. The Oscars announce its nominees in a week.
 

Edit Module