Tips for Becoming a Better Mentor, Boss, or Employer

Help your star interns reach the next level — even after they’ve left he nest.



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With any luck, you’re saying goodbye to an outstanding intern—or a crop of them—as the summer ’ship season comes to a close. Whether they perfected your latté order or got you through a crunch, there’s still time to show your appreciation. A few of our past and present interns share their words of wisdom for making your interns’ last days meaningful—and maybe wooing them back down the line. (Don’t forget those glowing LinkedIn referrals.) 

A recommendation in PDF/Word format to attach to online job applications is huge. I did an internship for the State Department and left with a rec from a fairly high-ranking diplomat, so although the internship was unpaid, the recommendation served as something tangible to point to that made the experience worthwhile.” —Philip Garrity, former 914INC. intern and, most recently, management consultant in Washington DC

“A senior employee at a previous internship introduced me to a potential future employer through email. I sent my resumé, and it’s been really helpful to have a contact in the field I want to go into.” —Lily Weinberg, Westchester Magazine/914INC. editorial intern

“At the end of my internship for Delaware's Governor Jack Markell, we were invited to the governor's mansion in Dover for a catered lunch. At the end of it, Mr. Markell gave us his advice for succeeding. I remember feeling valued because he took the time to speak with us and invited us to his home.” —Jacqueline Kalil, Westchester Magazine/914INC. editorial/art intern

“The most helpful part of my 914INC. internship was the feedback, whether on a job well done, or ways to improve—from phone etiquette to writing techniques. It helped me realize my strong suits and areas I needed to work on. After the internship, I knew my former editor was an email away, willing to help out with any question I had.” —Scott Simone, editorial assistant at Westchester Magazine and 914INC.

“At the end of one of my internships, my now-mentor took me to lunch. We had a great time talking about his career so far and my future plans. I wholeheartedly encourage any boss to get to know your interns. They will probably end up surprising you.” —Austen Hufford, former 914INC. intern currently studying economics at the University of Michigan

“Meeting people and seeing how they work and communicate were vital lessons that saved me much grief later on. Being able to go to events outside the office and see the impact the work you do has firsthand is great, too. One person I used to work with still lets me know the when and where of upcoming events.” —Adam Nunez, videographer at Westchester Magazine and former Westchester Magazine art intern 

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