Power Outage

Allegations of politics, back-room deals, and impending economic devastation have elected officials and the business community in Westchester blowing their stacks over the closing of Indian Point.



Referred to as a “ticking time bomb” by Governor Andrew Cuomo, Entergy’s Indian Point is scheduled to close forever in 2021. But the news has ignited a firestorm of controversy and protest from all quarters. Here are some salient facts, figures, and comments about the Buchanan nuclear power plant, which over its 55-year history has become as intextricably linked to Westchester as the Tappan Zee Bridge.

 

“Nearly half of Buchanan’s operating budget is financed by revenue from the [Indian Point] plant.” —Theresa Knickerbocker, mayor of Buchanan

 

 

Estimated electric-rate increase to consumers: 6.3% or $374 million per year,  totaling $11.5 billion (inflation adjusted).

 

“Without a viable replacement source, ratepayers in New York City could be burdened with higher energy prices for years.”— the New York Times

 

Estimated amount of annual donation dollars lost to Westchester charities from Entergy’s departure: $2 million

 

“Three people in a room — basically, the governor, the head of the power company, and Riverkeeper — got to cut a good deal for themselves, leaving the taxpayers and ratepayers to hold the bag. So the joke is on us. … The last middle-class person in the state is going to turn off the lights, literally.” — Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino

 

A 2012 study prepared by Albany-based management consulting firm Energy Strategies, Inc., estimated a total of $200 million per year in lost wages from closing the plant and more than $4 billion lost over 20 years.

 

“Indian Point has been a strong corporate partner for almost every town, city, and municipality in Westchester County. Okay, Governor Cuomo, you got your wish: The plant is closing. Now what?” — John Ravitz, executive vice president and COO, the Business Council of Westchester

 

25% of the electricity of New York City and the Hudson Valley, and 12% of the electricity of New York State.

 

 

 
Edit Module